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How to Develop Your Leadership into a Workplace Culture

Blog / June 10, 2021

Leadership and culture are extremely important in any company. They’re different, but they’re intertwined. Culture includes your company vision and strategic plan. The example you set for your employees and the way you exert your leadership determines your workplace culture. Your company values and culture will either repel or attract the best employees and customers. Here’s how to embed your values and mission into your company culture. 

Talk about it 

As the leader of a company, it’s your job to articulate the culture and spread it to your employees. You must have an expression of your

culture and values as part of your mission statement. Develop a vocabulary with adjectives and nouns that reinforce your mission use them in your internal and external communications, as well as in your daily conversations.

Demonstrate it 

Lead by example. The decisions you make every day will help to transmit your values and create the culture. As a leader, your actions are contagious. So if you’re showing up early and working hard, those around you will understand that they’re expected to do the same. But if you’re preaching one thing and doing another, that culture of hypocrisy and deceit will take over your company. And if you don’t believe in your values yourself, neither will your employees.

Find it in resumes 

Sure, there are certain technical positions where you need to prioritize skills and experience, but core values cannot be taught, so make sure your hiring managers know the traits you’re looking for. Make your cultural language a big part of your recruiting, onboarding, and training procedures. 

Hold others accountable 

Don’t micromanage your staff, but do keep an eye on your staff so you can determine whether or not they’re keeping your values and mission alive. The traits you’re looking for should match how you evaluate your employees in performance appraisals and what you require when you look to promote from within. Point out behaviors that are inconsistent with the organizational culture you’re trying to achieve. 

Reward for it

Make an example of your employees who best demonstrate the culture you want. Praise them and reward them. When your employees have actual examples, they’re more likely to emulate it. When you dole out perks, benefits, and bonuses, make sure to make your cultural vocabulary part of the process to reinforce your mission. 

Commemorate it 

When your desired culture has been reached and your company is enjoying the fruits of that labor—securing a new account, improving efficiency, attracting new customers—celebrate with your employees. Articulate that the success is attributed to their hard work, and those strategies and tactics will become accepted as part of everyday life.

 

For more assistance on developing the right company culture, check out our website at https://www.chiefofstaffkc.com.

Blog written by Erin Greenhalgh